Skip to main content
This site is under construction. Thank you for your patience.

*Original paper documents for Chapter 9 are in archival boxes K01 and K02 in the Egyptian Section archives of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Details

  • Classification
    Documentation-Unpublished manuscripts
  • Department
    Harvard University-Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition
  • Credit Line
    Harvard University–Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition
  • Date
    about 1934–1942
  • Author
    George Andrew Reisner, American, 1867–1942
  • Mentioned on page
    Akhethetep (G 7650)
    Akhi (G 4750)
    Ankh-haf (G 7510)
    Djedefre
    Djoser
    Duaenre (G 5110)
    Hetepheres II (G 7110-7120)
    Kawab (G 7110-7120)
    Khafre
    Khufu
    Khufukhaf [I] (G 7130-7140)
    Menkaure
    Meretites (G 7650)
    Minkhaf (G 7430-7440)
    Nefretkau (G 7050)
    Snefru

Tombs and Monuments 8

Photos 1

People 17

Ancient People

  • Akhethetep (G 7650)

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Remarks Owner (with wife Meretites) of G 7650. Identified as [Hm-nTr xwfw smr watj Hm (bAw) nxn xrp aH aD-mr wHaw (Apdw) ] priest of Khufu, sole companion, priest of the bas of Nekhen, director of the palace, administrator of fishers(/fowlers).
  • Akhi (G 4750)

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Remarks Owner of G 4750. Chapel entrance lintel (in fragments: 14-2-13, KHM Vienna ÄS 7801, KHM Vienna ÄS 8542) and drum lintel inscribed for Akhi, identified as [sAb aD-mr (Hrj-)sStA (wr) mDw Sma xrp nstj jmj-r Snwt nswt jmj-r prwj-HD jmj-r sSw aprw jmj-r kAt nb(t) nswt] judge and administrator, secretary, (great one) of the tens of Upper Egypt, director of the two thrones, overseer of royal granaries, overseer of the two treasuries, overseer of scribes of the crews, overseer of all royal works; 14-2-13 found in G 4734 A, KHM Vienna ÄS 7801 and 8542 found in G 4750. Relief fragment (Turin S.1870) inscribed for Akhi, idenitified as [jmj-r Snwt nswt] overseer of royal granaries; excavated by Schiaparelli, exact findspot unknown.
  • Ankh-haf (G 7510)

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Remarks Owner of G 7510. Husband of Hetepheres.
  • Djedefre

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Remarks Third king of Dynasty 4. Son (?) of Khufu.
  • Djoser

    • Type Mentioned on page
  • Duaenre (G 5110)

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Remarks Owner of G 5110. Appears in chapel relief (west, south, east, and north walls [only lower legs and feet preserved in situ on west, east, and north walls], and chapel entrance north and south door jambs), and displaced fragment of lintel (MFA 34.1465), identified as [sA nswt n Xt=f jrj(-pat) HAtj-a tAjtj sS mDAt-nTr r nxn r p nb] king's son of his body, hereditary (prince), count, vizier, scribe of the divine book, mouth of Nekhen, mouth of every Butite; in situ in G 5110. Uninscribed sarcohpagus of Duaenre (Turin S.1838, Turin S.1839); Schiaparelli excavations. Possibly same individual as Duare (in G 3098b) and/or Duaenre (in G 8172).
  • Hetepheres II (G 7110-7120)

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Remarks Original owner of G 7110, along with Kawab (owner of G 7120). Appears with her daughter Meresankh III in G 7530-7540 (east and west walls, main room), and in pair statue MFA 30.1456 (= 27-4-963 + 27-4-964 + 27-4-965). Later married to a king, possibly Djedefre (Radjedef) according to Reisner, but Khafre is also a possibility. Her association with G 7350, and its sarcophagus is uncertain. Also mentioned in tomb of her steward Khemetnu (owner of G 5210).
  • Kawab (G 7110-7120)

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Remarks Owner of G 7120, along with Hetepheres [II] (original owner of G 7110). Son of Khufu and Meretites [I]. Appears in chapel relief in tomb of his daughter Meresankh III (owner of G 7530-7540), main room (east wall), identified as [jrj-pat sA nswt smsw n Xt=f Xrj-Hb Hrj-tp xrp jAwt nTrt aA dwAw] hereditary prince, king's eldest son of his body, chief lector-priest, director of divine offices, assistant of (the god) Duau; in situ in G 7530-7540). Also mentioned in tomb of his steward Khemetnu (owner of G 5210).
  • Khafre

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Remarks Fourth king of Dynasty 4. Son of Khufu. Builder of the Second Pyramid at Giza and probably of the Great Sphinx as well. Known two thousand years later by the Greeks as King Khephren. A number of diorite and greywacke statues and statue fragments depicting the king have been discovered in Khafre's valley temple, including Cairo CG 9-17. The fragmentary head of an alabaster royal statue (MFA 21.351 + MFA 33.1113) is attributed to Khafre.
  • Khufu

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Remarks Second king of Dynasty 4, son of Snefru. Builder of the Great Pyramid at Giza, the only one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World still standing. Known two thousand years later by the Greeks as King Cheops. Horus name: [mDdw] Medjedu. Full birth-name: Khnum-Khufu.
  • Khufukhaf [I] (G 7130-7140)

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Remarks Son of Khufu and probably Henutsen. He is buried in G 7140.
  • Menkaure

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Remarks Fifth king of Dynasty 4. Son of Khafre. Husband of Khamerernebti II. Builder of the Third Pyramid at Giza. Known two thousand years later by the Greeks as King Mycerinus.
  • Meretites (G 7650)

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Remarks Owner (with husband Akhethetep) of G 7650. Identified as [sAt nswt n Xt=f Hm-nTr xwfw Hm-nTr HwtHr Hm-nTr Nt] king's daughter of his body, priestess of Khufu, priestess of Hathor, priestess of Neith. Parents are probably Khufu and Meretites [I].
  • Minkhaf (G 7430-7440)

    • Type Mentioned on page
  • Nefretkau (G 7050)

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Remarks Probably Daughter of Snefru Probably Mother of Nefermaat (G 7060)
  • Snefru

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Remarks First king of Dynasty 4. Father of Khufu.

Modern People

  • George Andrew Reisner

    • Type Author
    • Nationality & Dates American, 1867–1942
    • Remarks Egyptologist, archaeologist; Referred to as "the doctor" and "mudir" (Arabic for "director") in the excavation records. Nationality and life dates from Who was Who in Egyptology.