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Diary Transcription:

microfilm: begin page 282

Sunday, March 8, 1925 (continued)

(3) G 7000 X (continued)
long as any objects remain there. This guard took up their duties at about sunset and, of course, reinforced by our own armed Qufti workmen.

The actual chamber of the burial is cut in the natural rock which is here extremely good and very white. The south wall is obscured with the furniture. In the west wall near the north end and at some distance above the floor level there is a large blocking of finely dressed limestone blocks set in gyps (= gypsum) and smeared over with it. It is impossible at present to estimate what this may close, whether a passage westwards or possibly a second chamber.
Against the east wall a number of rough stones are piled up; it is not clear yet for what purpose.
On the floor against the east wall there are other staves (?) or poles so it is possible the whole may have been a canopy of golden streamers standing over the sarcophagus. Could the curious limestone objects of [Friday, March 6, No. 6 // GAR] have been originally intended as supports(?) [April 5, 1925 It now seems very probable T. R. D. G]

Rowe asked for the assistance of Mr. Lucas, at present in Luxor, in order more satisfactorily to deal with the technical processes of preservation of the antiquities found in this tomb. This was readily promised.
During the evening two journalists attempted to obtain information at the Camp saying that all Cairo knew we had made a great discovery. They were of course refused any statement whatever.

Monday, March 9, 1925
116th day of work

work on:
(1) Street G 7000
(2) Avenue G 0
(3) G 7000 X

[Said: (1) Street G 7000, (2) pit G 7000 X, (3) most G 7214, (4) pit G 7610 P, (5) most G 7215]

(1) Street G 7000
Now clearing debris in east side of street to the north of "94." During the afternoon the foundation platform of a structure, resembling that of the temple of G I-d, was partially cleared. Three holes similar to those known and described elsewhere were found in a line the eastward prolongation of the south face of the boat near G I-a. They average 30 cm in width and are at 185, 305 and 575 cm respectively west of the casing blocks of G 7120.
The whole of this area will be cleared after certain other works have been completed.

microfilm: end page 282

Details

  • Classification
    Documentation-Expedition diary pages
  • Department
    Harvard University-Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition
  • Credit Line
    Harvard University–Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition
  • Display Page Dates
    03/08/1925; 03/09/1925
  • Author
    Thomas Richard Duncan Greenlees, British, 1899–
  • Mentioned on page
    Alan Jenvey Rowe, British, 1890–1968
    Alfred Lucas, British, 1867–1945
    Thomas Richard Duncan Greenlees, British, 1899–

Tombs and Monuments 6

Photos 1

People 4

Modern People

  • Alan Jenvey Rowe

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Nationality & Dates British, 1890–1968
    • Remarks Egyptologist and archaeologist. Nationality and life dates from Who was Who in Egyptology.
  • Alfred Lucas

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Nationality & Dates British, 1867–1945
    • Remarks Chemist. Nationality and life dates from Who was Who in Egyptology.
  • Thomas Richard Duncan Greenlees

    • Type Author
    • Nationality & Dates British, 1899–
    • Remarks Thomas Richard Duncan Greenlees, born South Africa, Sivaratri, March 10, 1899. British subject with a Scottish father and an English mother. For a brief period during 1925 he was a staff member of Harvard University--Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition, who later joined the Theosophist movement in India. Greenlees received his MA degree in 1922 from Oxford, where he studied Egyptian, Coptic and Arabic. April 2,1925, Greenlees appointed Assistant Curator of Egyptian Art at MFA.
  • Thomas Richard Duncan Greenlees

    • Type Mentioned on page
    • Nationality & Dates British, 1899–
    • Remarks Thomas Richard Duncan Greenlees, born South Africa, Sivaratri, March 10, 1899. British subject with a Scottish father and an English mother. For a brief period during 1925 he was a staff member of Harvard University--Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition, who later joined the Theosophist movement in India. Greenlees received his MA degree in 1922 from Oxford, where he studied Egyptian, Coptic and Arabic. April 2,1925, Greenlees appointed Assistant Curator of Egyptian Art at MFA.